Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award 2009

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Afbeelding 1
We posted something about this before, but it was on CNN earlier this evening. So we’d like to emphasize it again as well! The Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award (ALMA) is the world’s largest prize for children’s and young people’s literature. The prize totals SEK 5 million and is awarded annually to a single recipient or to several. Authors, illustrators, storytellers and those active in reading promotion may be rewarded. The prize aims to strengthen and increase interest in children’s and young people’s literature globally. The award is designed to strengthen children’s rights at global level. An expert jury names prize-winners who are nominated by institutions and organisations worldwide. The Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award is administered by the Swedish Arts Council.

Perseverance, audacity and resourcefulness

With perseverance, audacity and resourcefulness, the Tamer Institute has, for two decades, stimulated Palestinian children’s and young adults’ love of reading – and their creativity. Under difficult circumstances, the Institute carries out reading promotion of an unusual breadth and versatility. In the spirit of Astrid Lindgren, the Tamer Institute acknowledges the power of words and the strength of books, stories and imagination as important keys to self-esteem, tolerance and the courage to face life.

The Tamer Institute for Community Education in Ramallah is an independent organisation that has carried out reading promotion work for children and young people in West Bank and Gaza since 1989. The Tamer Institute was founded to give children access to books and alternative learning as children’s and young people’s schooling, leisure time and lives suffered from the troubles in the area. The Tamer Institute also hands out reading passports. Holders get a stamp for every book they have read. This is a clear symbol of the fact that there are no borders for those who can read books. As Astrid Lindgren said: “Good children’s literature gives the child a place in the world and the world a place in the child”.

The Tamer Institute is the hub of a network that works with writing workshops, storytelling, drama and literary discussion for children and young people. They supply libraries with children’s books and they train librarians and parents. A national reading campaign is organised every year, culminating with National Reading Week. In 2008, the campaign reached 52,000 children in refugee camps and remote villages and communities, who took part in literary discussion, drama and drawing and writing workshops.

The Tamer Institute also carries out youth activities. The young people, who have often participated in Tamer’s work since they were children, publish their own newspaper, Yara´at, among other things. They use it to publish their thoughts, poems and stories. When the Tamer Institute was founded, there were virtually no Palestinian children’s books. The organisation has now published more than 130 titles and several of the children who attended the Tamer Institute’s writing workshops have started to write their own books as adults.

Despite difficult circumstances, the Tamer Institute works tirelessly on many levels to create a better situation for Palestinian children and young people via literature. Their conviction that words can tear down walls has resulted in innovative reading promotion activities of an unusual breadth, for which reason the Tamer Institute has been awarded the 2009 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award.

(source: http://www.alma.se)

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Dancing on Duke and Lennon….

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Starring: Dizzy (solo dancer), Clochard ( black n white) , mademoiselle Souris (white) and Simba aka DeNiro aka Zorn aka Obelix (dark tiger).

Music: George Duke – A Little Bit of Seven; Nigey Lennon – Ship in a Bottle

http://myjazzworld.blogspot.com/2007/07/george-duke-save-country.html

George Duke himself says the following about this album: “This was my first solo album for an American Record Company. Dick Bock wanted me to record some current pop material. We chose Laura Nyro, Judy Collins, and Paul McCartney. On the album were my buddies John Heard bass and Dick Berk on drums. I met Jay Graydon (guitar) while working with The Don Ellis Big Band, and liked his playing a lot. Of course he went on to become a great producer. The horn section consisted of Ernie Watts sax & flute, Jay Daversa and Charles Findley trumpets, Ernie Tack and Glenn Ferris trombone. I also met Glenn while I worked with Don Ellis. The album is an eclectic mix of Jazz Funk using pop material, with some straight ahead tunes thrown in. The LP was recorded, I believe, during the Spring of 1970 while I was touring with Frank Zappa. His influence is certainly felt in this album.”

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It’s a guy’s thing

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These are three of the four kittens found by a neighbour. They’re still very small, but seem to be fine. They’re pretty fast learning as well. They eat on their own, know where to take a leak (not all the time) and have fine sharp teeth and nails too.

Lovely little creatures to observe and help grow into loving entertaining companions for someone who can offer them a good home…

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Ibn al Haytham – The First Scientist – Alhazen

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ginafbjuneWhile devout Steely Dan fans and listeners can enjoy the abundance offered in special concerts and whatnot in the USA and Europe, life around Mizar6 is kind of incubated it seems. For frequent Steely news, please visit Radio Dupree.

I am wearing reading glasses. Must say that they really help prevent fatigue as the evening sets and the computer keeps on buzzing. It’s a perfect opportunity to reflect on this amazing discovery we, like so many other things, take for granted.

Recently I came in contact with a journalist who runs an international journal in the region. I approached him via Facebook. We spoke on the phone, but pretty soon it became evident that the fact that I have many Arab-Palestinian people in my friends list, ruled against me. Well, not as much against me, but against a good first impression, from that journalist’s point of view, of course!

He asked if I was a muslem myself and later on, via another internet social network, mentioned the “Islam propaganda” once again, referring to my Facebook page, activities and friends, no doubt.

Not only did his response shock me at first, it made me angry when I gave it some more thought. What ignorance and short-sightedness!

But there are many people in this world who see Muslems and Islam solely as a threat to, yes, to what I wonder…? As if “the” Muslems are responsible for all the injustice done in the world, as if “the” Muslems are a danger to civilization.

So, wearing these reading glasses made me think that not all short-sightedness can be fixed wearing spectacles, a development in optics originally initiated by Ibn al Haytham, who is considered to be the First Scientist… yes. An Arab. A Muslem. Who makes a spectacle of himself now, I wonder…

“Abu Ali al-Hasan ibn al-Hasan ibn al-Haytham was the first person to test hypotheses with verifiable experiments, developing the scientific method more than 200 years before European scholars learned of it—by reading his books.

Born in Basra in 965, Ibn al-Haytham first studied theology, trying unsuccessfully to resolve the differences between the Shi’ah and Sunnah sects. He then turned his attention to the works of the ancient Greek philosophers and mathematicians, including Euclid and Archimedes. He completed the fragmentary Conics by Apollonius of Perga. He was the first person to apply algebra to geometry, founding the branch of mathematics known as analytic geometry.

A devout Muslim, Ibn al-Haitham believed that human beings are flawed and only God is perfect. To discover the truth about nature, he reasoned, one had to eliminate human opinion and allow the universe to speak for itself through physical experiments. “The seeker after truth is not one who studies the writings of the ancients and, following his natural disposition, puts his trust in them,” he wrote, “but rather the one who suspects his faith in them and questions what he gathers from them, the one who submits to argument and demonstration.”

In his massive study of light and vision, Kitâb al-Manâzir (Book of Optics ), Ibn al-Haytham submitted every hypothesis to a physical test or mathematical proof. To test his hypothesis that “lights and colors do not blend in the air,” for example, Ibn al-Haytham devised the world’s first camera obscura, observed what happened when light rays intersected at its aperture, and recorded the results. Throughout his investigations, Ibn al-Haytham followed all the steps of the scientific method.”

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