Dancing on Duke and Lennon….

Starring: Dizzy (solo dancer), Clochard ( black n white) , mademoiselle Souris (white) and Simba aka DeNiro aka Zorn aka Obelix (dark tiger).

Music: George Duke – A Little Bit of Seven; Nigey Lennon – Ship in a Bottle

http://myjazzworld.blogspot.com/2007/07/george-duke-save-country.html

George Duke himself says the following about this album: “This was my first solo album for an American Record Company. Dick Bock wanted me to record some current pop material. We chose Laura Nyro, Judy Collins, and Paul McCartney. On the album were my buddies John Heard bass and Dick Berk on drums. I met Jay Graydon (guitar) while working with The Don Ellis Big Band, and liked his playing a lot. Of course he went on to become a great producer. The horn section consisted of Ernie Watts sax & flute, Jay Daversa and Charles Findley trumpets, Ernie Tack and Glenn Ferris trombone. I also met Glenn while I worked with Don Ellis. The album is an eclectic mix of Jazz Funk using pop material, with some straight ahead tunes thrown in. The LP was recorded, I believe, during the Spring of 1970 while I was touring with Frank Zappa. His influence is certainly felt in this album.”

Les eaux de mars (Águas de Março) – Monica Freire, Ariane Moffatt et Coral Egan

Jimi & the U.S. Army

hendrixarmyJames Marshall “Jimi” Hendrix is another artist whose dedication to his art—and resistance to authority—show up clearly in his military file.

Hendrix enlisted in the Army in May 1961, at the age of 18. Under the heading “Avocations and Sports,” his Enlisted Qualification Record states, “Plays Guitar (3 yrs).” Both creativity and nonconformity are revealed by other enlistment documents, such as a security questionnaire on which Hendrix takes a novel approach to filling in check boxes.

Hendrix’s interest in guitar seems to have taken precedence over any commitment to military service. “Pvt Hendrix plays a musical instrument during his off duty hours, or so he says,” declares one Sgt. Louis Hoekstra. “This is one of his faults, because his mind apparently cannot function while performing duties and thinking about his guitar.” A training record from July 1961 shows Hendrix at the bottom of the heap in marksmanship—ranked 36th out of a group of 36. While he may have been right on the mark with a guitar, with a rifle he was not even close.

In a request that Hendrix be subjected to physical and psychiatric examination, a Capt. Gilbert Batchman asserts, “Individual is unable to conform to military rules and regulations. Misses bed check; sleeps while supposed to be working; unsatisfactory duty performance. Requires excessive supervision at all times.” A May 1962 document recommending that Hendrix be discharged from service states tersely, “No known good characteristics.”

Within a few years, Hendrix would be hailed as one of the most influential electric guitarists of all time.

(thanks to dr.Wu for sending it in)